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Thursday, December 14, 2017

Pankaj Mishra - The opinionated man with a cause


Pankaj Mishra  may well be the right person who  might set the wheels in motion

Source:   Welcome to the age of Anger  ( article - The Guardian)




PART I 
The insurgencies of our time, including Brexit and the rise of the European far right, have many local causes – ...

but it is not an accident that demagoguery appears to be rising around the world.

Savage violence has erupted in recent years across a broad swath of territory: wars in ....

The conflicts, not confined to fixed battlefields, feel endemic (+++ years?)and uncontrollable.

Hate-mongering against immigrants and minorities has gone mainstream;

figures foaming at the mouth with loathing and malice are ubiquitous on old and new media alike.


PART II 

There is much dispute about the causes of this global disorder. 
 
Many observers have characterised it as a backlash against an out-of-touch establishment, explaining Trump’s victory in a handful of ways: 

– in the words of French economist Thomas Piketty –  “primarily due to the explosion in economic and geographic inequality in the United States”

The Nobel prize-winning economist Paul Krugman admitted: “people like me – and probably like most readers of the New York Times – truly didn’t understand the country we live in”. 



PART III 

Here, Indian author Pankaj Mishra argues that we need to look again at the ideals that underpin democracy. 

Why are people so angry? Blame modernity


   BBC video



In Age of Anger, published in early 2017, Pankaj Mishra answers our bewilderment by casting his gaze back to the eighteenth century, before leading us to the present.


TASK-  READ the short comments on his book and select four for next day. Below, my pick:

“Lucid, incisive and provocative…a panoramic survey of the populist wind roiling the world and a genealogy of the ressentiment propelling it….By recognizing the existential roots of politics and tracing its antecedents, Mishra has made perhaps the most valuable contribution to the understanding of our turbulent age.”–Muhammad Idrees Ahmad, The National

     “The ideal writer to diagnose our current moment…We live in revolutionary times. In Age of Anger, Mishra has produced an urgent analysis of a moment in which the forgotten and dispossessed are rising up to challenge everything we thought we knew about the state of the world.”—Sebastian Strangio, Los Angeles Review of Books

“Bracing and illuminating…Mishra writes with…style, energy and incision…[He] dwells in the realm of ideas and emotions, which get short shrift in most accounts of global politics…A decent liberalism would read sharp critics like Mishra and learn.”–Franklin Foer, New York Times Book Review

“Riveting…Mishra paints in thick, furious strokes, then lingers on minute details…This book makes you feel smarter for having read it, even if you feel a little stupid first.”–Carlos Lozada, Washington Post

“Impressive…Our current situation is recapitulating some of the most violent and dangerous episodes in modern history….With powerful and worrisome insights, Pankaj Mishra has clarified our present.”–Michael S. Roth, San Francisco Chronicle















Wednesday, December 13, 2017

TEH_11. CATALAN CONNECTIONS talk with Brandon & Caroline


TEH_11. CATALAN CONNECTIONS talk 
with  Brandon & Caroline

TODAY at our listening test with The English Hour, Marcela Topor interviews Brandon Jones i Caroline Wynne, del Festival Irlandès-Català.



 (25/10/2017)   Correspondent: Gemma Vila

For our first part, listen up to the first 11 minutes, taking NOTES on these 12 questions:
 
Q1_ Which are the origins of the festival?
Q2_ What is the Irish part and how was it involved?
Q3_ Why did they choose Creative Connexions name?
Q4_ How successful has it been?
Q5_ What do we learn about Caroline Wynne live in Ireland (lives, where from)?
Q6_ How many times does she come to Barcelona?
Q7_ What did you get about Brandon’s background?
Q8_ What kind of activities can you find in Creative Connexions festival this October?
Q9_ What makes the difference from other Irish festivals?
Q10_ What is up with the Casinos rivalry in Sitges?
Q11_ What calls the attention of the Irish people when they come to Sitges?
Q12_ How many people do participate in the festival?


If you enjoyed their talk, continue watching this interesting interview.

Follow up:

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And now, visit the October Sitges festival at http://www.creative-connexions.eu/




And now... check your answers below.

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TEH_11. CATALAN CONNECTIONS talk with  Brandon & Caroline __   KEY 


Q1_ Which are the origins of the festival?
(1.29) It was over a bar, a drink in my bar in Sitges […] In the small hours, Caroline told Brandon she had a company in Ireland about culture (poetry, dance...)  and the idea came up.

Q2_ What is the Irish part and how was it involved?
(2.05) She went back to Ireland and it was the year of Dublin hold the presidency of the EU. So the ministry wanted cultural proposals to spread  Irish culture. She met the 48 hour deadline to submit the proposal and... three weeks later it was approved!

Q3_ Why did they choose Creative Connexions name?
(2.50) She liked the name because the spelling and the sound of it is almost the same in all languages.

Q4_  How successful has it been?
(3.02) She proposed after the success of the year event to become a stand-alone event... and quite successful as they are five years running it now.

Q5_ What do we learn about Caroline Wynne live in Ireland (lives, where from)?
(3.30)  Although living in Dublin, she's from the North West of Ireland, a part close to Sligo, not very touristical. She lives near the airport in the capital.

Q6_ How many times does she come to Barcelona?
(4.14)  Four, five times a year, sometimes just for a quick meeting in Sitges.

  
Q7_ What did you get about Brandon’s background?
(4.45) He explains his family comes from South Wales. But he also mention that his grandmother was Irish, he is part Irish.

Q8_ What kind of activities can you find in Creative Connexions festival this October?
(6.40) There are over 60 cultural activities running on the three days. Theatre, dance, performances, poetry […] and for the whole family.

Q9_ What makes the difference from other Irish festivals?
(6.50) They wanted it to be an arts festival,  not just another Irish festival abroad but a festival that really engages another culture.

Q10_ What is up with the Casinos rivalry in Sitges?
(7.37) One is el Prado and another el Retiro, one represents the part socialist of the city and the other the conservative […] they are antagonists, but the festival has connected both. Succcessful at engaging them both.

Q11_ What calls the attention of the Irish people when they come to Sitges?
(8.28) When Irish people come over and they see the outdoor spaces and stages because they only have that in the large towns.

 Q12_ How many people do participate in the festival?

(9.34) There are over 40 professional artists, then some youth and semi professional actors [..] in total there will be 320 people performing at the weekend.

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

TEH_10. GOING NATIVE talk with Tony Corvillo -part 2

TEH_10.  GOING NATIVE talk with  Tony Corvillo  ( part II )

http://www.elpuntavui.tv/video/244311216.html               (17/09/2017)   Correspondent: Judit Ruiz


For our second part, listen up from the minute 10, taking NOTES on questions 10-18:

Q10_ In which sense his two acting moments at El cor de la ciutat were not alike?
Q11_ How does he remember the audience reaction to his acting on the screen?
Q13_ What does he mention about a father director and his son?
Q14_ What does he prefer? to be in theatre, films or television?
Q15_ What experience does he share from the El Principe series (on TV1)?
Q16_ Where do actors have more time to prepare their characters, in television or in movies? 
Q17_ What about your new project?

Q18_ Who started with the idea of such a product?

Q19_ Why an idea of a project could be so difficult to become a reality?




you may find the  previous part  of the interview Q1-9 at earliest entry.
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TEH_10b.  GOING NATIVE talk with  Tony Corvillo  (part II)  ... KEY 
http://www.elpuntavui.tv/video/244311216.html      (17/09/2017)   Correspondent: Judit Ruiz
 Q10_  In which sense his two acting moments at El cor de la ciutat were not alike?
 The director wanting him to act sporadiccaly in his first chance, but he made him a regular the year later. Q11_  How does he remember the audience reaction to his acting on the screen? The people on the street father did shout at his son at the sequence. They remember him as a character with his bad moods outside the series! he reminisces a moment at the queue of a barça event someone there warning his girlfriend: "You have to leave that man".
 Q12_  What does he mention about a father director and his son? The father did shout at his son at the sequence and was criticised for being a bad father, but it was his professionality as any director would have done to get the best acting in that situation. (13:35 --->) Q13_  What does he prefer?  to be in theatre, films or television?He does prefer theatre, the coolest media, with no take 2, audience reaction... but it doesn’t make a living.  His last two theatre pieces the pay was low standard, so he quit. Also television or movies, being good to adapt to every media (14:15 --->) Q14_  What experience does he share from the El Principe series (on TV1)?Great to be such an asshole. Acting as a bad character he got great fun and discussed with director his part.  He remembers one bit with the bus driver who was very realistic. He, the man, hated his character in the series... so he was pleased to have created a good performance. Shot guns, being a kid again.  (15:12 --->) Q15_  Where do actors have more time to prepare their characters, in television or in movies?In a movie you have more time than on television. For example in soap operas you don’t have time to prepare your character. You run the lines. It´s great 'cos you learn to be fast. (17:12 --->) Q16_  What about your new project?It´s about a road trip that gives information of locations and towns in Catalonia. His cousin is also in... and at the same time it´s entertaining.  HE interviews the bell ringer in the first epidode about Les Borges Blanques (18:28 --->) Q17_   Who started with the idea of such a product?It´s the child-product of Victor, his Lleida friend, they have cooperated in many projects, always brainstorming for something new. Toni co-scripted the first pilot programme.rustrate because all the decisions are related to money. If you want to do something you need money to pay cameras and for a lot of other things. (20:58 --->) Q18_   Why an idea of a project could be so difficult to become a reality?It´s frustrate because all the decisions are related to money. If you want to do something you need money to pay cameras and for a lot of other things. (22:44 --->)



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TEH_10. GOING NATIVE talk with Tony Corvillo (part I)

TEH_10.  GOING NATIVE talk with  Tony Corvillo  (part I)

TODAY at our listening test with The English Hour, Neil Stokes interviews actor Toni Corvillo   (until minute 10:00)
(17/09/2017)   Correspondent: Judit Ruiz

For our first part, listen up to the minute 10, taking NOTES on these 9 questions:

       Q1_ When did he graduate? what put him in the track of acting studies?
Q2_  How What was his first learning course? which specialty/skills? successful? Q3_  How indirect was his approach at acting? Q4_  What does he tell us about his acting experience in the states? Q5_  In what sense did English language affected his schooling life? Q6_  What experience set the wheels in motion for him to realise what he want to do? Q7_  How does he remember performing it in class? his classmates reactions? Q8_  What did he ponder at that moment? Q9_  What does he say about the ups and downs in being a professional actor? 

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you may find the rest of the interview Q10-18 at next entry.
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       TEH_10a.  GOING NATIVE talk with  Tony Corvillo  (part I)  ........ KEY 

Q1_ When did he graduate? what put him in the track of acting studies?

Toni graduated in 2003, but he started many years earlier. He got a low mark at Selectivitat (State A-levels tests) so he could not go to his preferred studies.. (0:53 ->)

Q2_  How What was his first learning course? which specialty/skills? successful?

First, Toni went to a course for flight attendant in Catalonia. He sent resumees to many companies home and abroad. No responses. He wasted his money as he never got to work as one. (1:50 --->)

Q3_  How indirect was his approach at acting?

He  got an advert about an audition at the Theatre school, passed it and at the end of the first year he got top grades. (2:25 --->)
Q4_  What does he tell us about his acting experience in the states?

Cold very cold. He went to Winsconsing University with no English skills, only the ones you acquire at school level. Now, looking back at these experiences, he ponders it was as great as it was tough. (4:05 --->)

Q5_  In what sense did English language affected his schooling life?

At the first semester I couldn´t get any credits because I didn’t have the toefl and the first certificate yet. He couldn't follow normal courses as he spent too much time with foreigners in a "English learning classroom"  with not very friendly atmosphere (4:40 --->)

Q6_  What experience set the wheels in motion for him to realise what he want to do?

Time earlier, while he was still in bcn, he had a clear moment writing a monologue for their final exam in class. It was scribbled in Balmes street in a Creperia next to Plaza Molina.  (6:02 --->)

Q7_  How does he remember performing it in class? his classmates reactions?

The performance was sad and when it finalize I looked all my classmates and succeeding at making the audience cry,  teacher included. So he thought it is amazing, and realised that Theatre is  cool. (6:32 --->)

Q8_  What did he ponder at that moment?

I thought that in this kind of job you can work at a supermarket or whatever and in consequence it´s the most powerful job in the world. You can make people laugh, cry and whatever you want. You only pretend move people. (7:02 --->)

Q9_  What does he say about the ups and downs in being a professional actor?

He also teaches. Lesson one: he respects his chosen profession for it. Being not famous, he is well aware of "Who knows if you are going to be working tomorow?". Nothing taken for granted! (8:12 --->)
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Monday, December 11, 2017

TEH_09. CATALAN CONNECTIONS talk with Isona Passola

TEH_09.  CATALAN CONNECTIONS talk with  Isona Passola

TODAY at our listening test with The English Hour, Marcela Topor interviews Isona Passola-President of the Catalan Film Academy
(17/11/2017)   Correspondent: Mª Àngels Cos
For our first part, listen up ONCE to whole conversation, taking NOTES on these 11 questions:

Q1- Are you used to giving a lot of interviews in English? and in Romanic languages?
Q2- What is your relationship with English, apart from practicing it, when you go to Cannes festival and in recent interviews with the international media? How did you learn it, where and how? How much do you practice it apart from the events?
Q3- What is her attitude towards dubbed films?
Q4- What about your professional background? You studied something completely different, so tell me, how did it go?
Q5-  How did you end up in becoming a producer?
Q6- If you had to choose from your five films, I’d say Incerta Glòria and Pa negre, they’re very famous and well-known…
Q7- At the present, you are promoting, travelling a lot with Incerta Glòria. What about this film, the origins? Tell me about the main challenges in producing it. You are a teacher on how to adapt literature to cinema. How did you decide to create it?
                ===  (film clip here (16:00-->)  ==
Q8-  Tell me the most difficult thing you remember about this film?
Q9- What’s the European standard?
Q10- Let’s talk about your new project. A film that will deal with refugees and based on David Cirici’s latest novel, The Angel.
Q11-  Will be shown in Catalan or other languages?

Q12-  Have you thought of any actors or it’s too soon?

TEH_08 . SMALL TALK with Alex Ewing




TEH_08 . SMALL TALK with Alex Ewing

TODAY at our listening test with The English Hour, Nicole Miller Interviews Alex Ewing, English teacher and translator  (17/11/2017)

Correspondent: Carles Dueñas

             For our first part, listen up to the minute 12:10 and answer the 12 questions:

Q1. Where was Alex Ewing born? what type of neighbouhood?
Q2. How did Alex Ewing’s parents meet?
 Q3. Did Alex Ewing’s parents plan their relationship and future?
Q4. At first, why did they decide to go to England?
Q5. Why did they comeback to Ecuador?
Q6. Where and when were Alex and his sisters born?
Q7. What did he do before going to University?
Q8. Why does Alex say that living in The Galápagos Islands for two weeks is one of the most amazing things that he has ever done?
Q9. How did he manage to keep his stay at low-budget journey?
Q10.  Copy a couple of interesting bits about his activities in the islands?
Q.11. Why did he end up in Catalonia?

Q.12. What does he like about Barcelona?