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Tuesday, December 27, 2016

Pinker- The world continues to improve in just about every way.

STEVEN PINKER
Professor in the Department of Psychology 
at Harvard University. He conducts research on language and cognition, writes for publications such as the New York Times, Time and The Atlantic, and is the author of ten books

It may have seemed like the world fell apart in 2016. Steven Pinker is here to tell you it didn’t. -link



“The world continues to improve in just about every way.”


 Dec 22, 2016,

  • Gun deaths compared to deaths from AIDS, illegal drug overdoses, war, and terrorism.J

  • Julia Belluz - So 2016 has been an incredibly stressful and violent year from a news standpoint for many people. Do you have any advice for putting it in context?

Steven Pinker

Look at history and data, not headlines. The world continues to improve in just about every way. Extreme poverty, child mortality, illiteracy, and global inequality are at historic lows; vaccinations, basic education, including girls, and democracy are at all-time highs.
War deaths have risen since 2011 because of the Syrian civil war, but are a fraction of the levels of the 1950s through the early 1990s, when megadeath wars and genocides raged all over the world. Colombia’s peace deal marks the end of the last war in the Western Hemisphere, and the last remnant of the Cold War. Homicide rates in the world are falling, and the rate in United States is lower than at any time between 1966 and 2009. Outside of war zones, terrorist deaths are far lower than they were in the heyday of the Weathermen, IRA, and Red Brigades.

  • Julia Belluz - One big thing that’s changed since we last spoke is the election of Donald Trump. We now have a president coming in who has said he wouldn’t defend America’s allies in NATO if we were attacked by a foreign power and who has strong links to Russia. His election came after Brexit. These really seem like threats to the global institutions that have likely helped sustain peace in recent years.

Steven Pinker

Several awful things happened in the world’s democracies in 2016, and the election of a mercurial and ignorant president injects a troubling degree of uncertainty into international relations.
But it’s vital to keep cool and identify specific dangers rather than being overcome by a vague apocalyptic gloom. Brexit may be regrettable, but it’s not going to lead to a war between the UK and Germany or France. A closeness to Russia is troubling in many ways, but it may reduce, rather than increase, the chance of a major war (so suggested the eminent peace researcher Nils Petter Gleditsch).
It’s easy to reach for historical analogies and speculate about Russian or Chinese imperial expansion, but as my colleague Graham Allison points out, you must consider the differences between current and past cases, not just similarities, and the differences are substantial.

  • Julia Belluz - One of the other alarming aspects of Trump’s rise to power is that he won, in part, by inciting racist tendencies. We know minority groups are afraid that racist people are going to be empowered under Trump, and there's some discussion that there's already been an uptick in racial violence here. Are you concerned about gains in racial equality in the US unraveling?

Steven Pinker

Beware of headlines. And beware of statistics from advocacy organizations whose funding stream depends on stoking fear and outrage — I’ve learned that they can never be taken at face value.
There are reasons to doubt that we’re seeing a big post-Trump rise in hate crimes. Rates of hate crime tend to track rates of overall crime, and there was an uptick of both in 2015, before Trumpism.
Indeed, Trump capitalized on the crime uptick to sow panic about the state of the nation, and progressives foolishly ceded the issue to him. Moment-by-moment analyses of Google searches by the data scientist Seth Stephens-Davidowitz show that Islamophobia strongly tracks incidents of terrorism with Muslim perpetrators. So hate crimes will probably depend more on overall crime rates and — in the case of Islamophobic hate crimes — on terrorist attacks than on a general atmosphere created by Trump.
More generally, the worldwide, decades-long current toward racial tolerance is too strong to be undone by one man. Public opinion polls in almost every country show steady declines in racial and religious prejudice­ — and more importantly for the future, that younger cohorts are less prejudiced than older ones. As my own cohort of baby boomers (who helped elect Trump) dies off and is replaced by millennials (who rejected him in droves), the world will become more tolerant.
It’s not just that people are increasingly disagreeing with intolerant statements when asked by pollsters, which could be driven by a taboo against explicit racism. Stephens-Davidowitz has shown that Google searches for racist jokes and organizations are sensitive indicators of private racism. They have declined steadily over the past dozen years, and they are more popular in older than younger cohorts.

  • Julia Belluz -Are you optimistic about the future?

Steven Pinker

I’ve never been “optimistic” in the sense of just seeing the glass as half-full — only in the sense of looking at trend lines rather than headlines. It’s irrational both to ignore good developments and to put a happy face on bad ones.
As it happens, most global, long-term trends have been positive. As for the future, I like the distinction drawn by the economist Paul Romer between complacent optimism, the feeling of a child waiting for presents, and conditional optimism, the feeling of a child who wants a treehouse and realizes that if he gets some wood and nails and persuades other kids to help him, he can build one. I am not complacently optimistic about the future; I am conditionally optimistic.
Read more with Pinker here.

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

curious headlines


Want to read this headline:

Unemployed man spent $2.1million on cars, strippers and parties following banking error?





And,




Here's a few curious headlines 

To all those journalists, purported English speakers and those who think they have mastered English 
and the rest of us simple readers... 



Explain the pun:
1. Something Went Wrong in Jet Crash, Expert Says
2. Local High School Dropouts Cut in Half
3. Prostitutes Appeal to Pope 

4. Panda Mating Fails; Veterinarian Takes Over 
5. Teacher Strikes Idle Kids
6. Miners Refuse to Work after Death 

7. Typhoon Rips Through Cemetery; Hundreds Dead 
8. Man Struck By Lightning Faces Battery Charge
9. Red Tape Holds Up New Bridges 
10. Kids Make Nutritious Snacks


Underline the ambiguous words in the following headlines



1a) Include your children when baking cookies.


1b) Drunks get nine years in violin case.


1c) Iraqi head seeks arms.


1d) Teacher strikes idle kids.


1e) Clinton wins budget - more lies ahead.





2a) New study of obesity looks for larger test group.


2b) Two sisters reunited after 18 years in checkout counter.

2c) If strike isn't settled quickly, it may last a while. 



2d) Couple slain - police suspect homicide. 


Tuesday, December 20, 2016

Morecambe and Wise - ‘the serious stuff’










When Eric Morecambe appeared on stage dressed entirely in black, nursing a skull, even the slightly obtuse Ernie immediately realized what was in the offing: Shakespeare’s Hamlet.


Death was no laughing matter. And when Morecambe and Wise debated the wisdom of switching to ‘the serious stuff’ like Shakespeare, they looked to their competitors Olivier and Gielgud, who played Shakespeare’s tragedies to packed houses every single week.
 
As Eric remarked in a mixture of envy and bemusement, ‘They charge £3 per seat . . . and they don’t get any laughs’.

Monday, December 19, 2016

British sketches - Morecambe and Wise -Ernie and Eric.


Bit 1. - The Morecambe and Wise partnership lasted 1968-83. ‘There’s too much lust for money in this world and not enough fun’, remarks Eric Morecambe in one of this warm Edinburgh Fringe hit’s more on the nose moments. 

Review -2013

To check how our lifes have changed over these tour decades, read how we celebrated Christmas in 1975.

Still in B/WTheir Christmas Show on BBC in 1977 scored one of the highest ever audiences in British television history with more than 20 million viewers. In 1999 Morecambe was voted the funniest person of the 20th century in a British internet poll; Eric pulled in 26 percent of the votes.
Bit 2. - Ernie and Eric. Their sketch looks so much like the classic Magnusson Mastermind. Morecambe and Wise sketch, which really featured Magnus Magnusson. 
Ernie plays a know-all professor who really does answer all the questions before they are asked, and Eric is a chancer who cons his way through, but looks set to lose on the last geography question, indeed a long one, where Eric has to complete the phrase – Khyber


MadamTussauds models -Wax museum
Bit 3. - In the 1970s, they were a national institution.Celebrities from Andre Previn to Diana Rigg queued to appear on their show. But almost every gag which came out of the mouths of Morecambe and Wise in their heyday was put there by Eddie Braben. His surreal and witty scripts transformed the duo's act, from the business in front of the curtains, to the pair's closing song.

LAUGHTERLOG. To learn about these two performers, click here

Video Clips - The Ed Sullivan Show



Watch the top 5 M&W sketches watched on YouTube - Daily mirror

Their five videos have been viewed by more than 2m people across the world.
Topping the Morecambe and Wise favourite works is the infamous breakfast sketch, that has been watched on YouTube a staggering 770,000 times.
Channel 5 is set to screen the rarely seen live performance by the comedy duo at 10.10pm tonight, Saturday 12 April 2014

Bit 4. -  Morecombe and Wise Breakfast




"Possibly the best comedy sketch ever, 
well planned, excellently timed by two comic genius's"

To test this statement....

TASK. Classify the youtube comments on these two types:

                           a1)  nostalgics (N)       versus              
                           a2)  projected onto the future (F)

           b1)  TOP class (10 /10 ) ...or
           b2)   pretty good  (7-8-9 /10) ...or
           b3)  negative 1-4/10
 

1.     OMG...Im laughing so much my face is killin' me and my cheeks are stinging me!!! 
2.     well, it is making a statement about race, but that does not stop it being comic genius aswell!_ 
3.     it still makes me laugh.. I think its brilliant, not the best of all sketches, but still great. 
4.     This is what you call comedy!! Much better that some of the rubbish around now. Its harmless, not offensive, rude or racist. 
5.     Brilliant. People are still going to be enjoying this 100 years in the future._ 
6.     It is a simple idea based around a normal mundane morning activity. Also it is brilliantly timed. 
7.     This is hilarious and worth sharing for a good laugh._ 
8.     One of the only times slpatstick has made me laugh :)_ 
9.     My all time favourite sketch from the two comedy giants. What a masterpiece of mirth! 
10.  God, I'd forgotten how brilliant those guys were. :-)_ 
11.  Pure brilliance, what timing!_ 
12.  Fantastic, never ceases to make me smile! 
13.  that has got to be one of the best things i have ever seen it is so funny._
14.  87th time I've seen that ... and I still laugh!_ 
15.  Love this so much!_ 
16.  funniest ever sketch. best ever comedy duo. 
17.  how can anyone dilike this? It is a masterpiece of comedy_ 
18.  The bit at the fridge makes me crack up. 
19.  classic! this is one of the best sketches they made. you don't get comedy like this nowadays. 
20.  Sure the comedy wasn't as subtle as some of the other shows at the time but it was still funny. Calling it a disgrace is a bit harsh. 
21.  LOL I remember the first time i watch this on TV I could not stop laughing. Its a great video. 
22.  Its got nothing to do with race or sexuality. It's a brilliant comedy sketch! That's it! Chill and have a laugh for a change!_
23.  Always will be a comedy classic, will never get tired of seeing it_
24.  i just wonder how they timed the toaster to the music..._ 
25.  wacked out but highly hilarious_ 
26.  This is a classic comedy sketch thats it. It's not making a statement about anyones colour. 
27.  M&W top the comedy bill of that generation, and there was a lot.28.  they should've been knighted._ 
29.  As simple as the sketch is, every time I see this it's very hard not to keep a straight face. Joy from beginning to end!_ 
30.  soo funny the timig of this is just soo perfect_ 
31.  What makes this sketch for me is Eric's reaction to the multiple pancakes._ 
32.  hilarious! this is what i call classic comedy. 
33.  ROFLMHO!!!!! - The sausage thng was so hilarious, mind you so was the whole lot!!! 
34.  hilarious! this is what i call classic comedy_ 
35.  I can see now why breakfast is the most important meal of the day!_ 
36.  just freaking awesome!! 0:45 epic!! 0:52 amazing!! i fell off the chair by the end!!_ 
37.  British comedy at its finest, if comedians today could take note of the comedians of yesteryear our comedy would be as good as it was back then._ 
38.  it repeats the same joke. Ultimately its comedy for old people with short attention spans. its basically little Britain in the 70's. 
39.  this still makes me laugh to this day.... So brilliant. 
40.  don't take my word for it, but i think there was a bit of shell in that egg. 
41.  Sheer genius......and what do we have today? 
42.  Funny? Yes. "Possibly the best comedy sketch ever"?? No way._


Sunday, December 18, 2016

The chaos - Written by Dutch writer, traveller, and teacher


"The Chaos" is a poem demonstrating the irregularity of English spelling and pronunciation. Written by Dutch writer, traveller, and teacher Gerard Nolst Trenité (1870–1946), it includes about 800 examples of irregular spelling. 
The first version of 146 lines of text appeared in an appendix to the author's 1920 textbook Drop Your Foreign Accent: engelsche uitspraakoefeningen, but "the most complete and authoritative version ever likely to emerge", published by The Spelling Society in 1992–93, has 274 lines.

             BIT 1. Text
To demonstrate the flavour of the poem, the opening lines are:
Dearest creature in creation
Studying English pronunciation,
I will teach you in my verse
Sounds like corpsecorpshorse and worse.
and the closing lines are:
Finally, which rhymes with enough,
Thoughthroughboughcoughhoughsoughtough??
Hiccough has the sound of cup...
My advice is: GIVE IT UP!
These lines are set out as in the author's version, with alternate couplets indented and the problematic words italicised

Dearest creature in creation,Study English pronunciation.I will teach you in my verseSounds like corpsecorpshorse, and worse.I will keep you, Susybusy,Make your head with heat grow dizzy. 
Tear in eye, your dress will tear.
So shall I! Oh hear my prayer.


Pray, console your loving poet,Make my coat look new, dear, sew it!Just compare heartbeard, and heard,Dies and dietlord and word,Sword and swardretain and Britain.(Mind the latter, how it's written.)Made has not the sound of bade,Say-saidpay-paidlaid, but plaid.

Now I surely will not plague youWith such words as vague and ague.But be careful how you speak:Say break and steak, but bleak and streak;Previouspreciousfuchsiavia; Cloven, oven, how and low,Script, receipt, shoe, poem, and toe.


TASK1. Read some reactions. Pick up the one you are closer to...:

  • Many words mispronounced. I am Canadian as well and have never heard "plait" prononounced like she did (British style - "platt"; American style - "plate")
  • To speak English, don't rely on an American, they live 3,000 miles away from England.
  • Well done for the most part and very helpful for us non-native speakers, but I'm sure your English teacher made many a mistake in pronouncing the uncommon words


             BIT 3. the trials
Compare these two attempts on youtube.

A clear and slow reading of "The Chaos". Read along with our English teacher - she has a clear, Canadian accent. Use your headphones for extra clarity. Enjoy!

Option one.

Option two. Jimmy Jams

Even a native English speaker has to find this interesting. English must be a very old language, because how else could one explain the random way we pronounce words? I guess the one good thing that has come out of the chaos: spelling bees! ;)

<iframe width="460" height="275" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1edPxKqiptw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen>


             BIT 3. CHALLENGE (get right 85 %)

Ready to learn some of it? Just try this 5-minute challenge. 

Poem is split in 12 small moutfull pieces!:


For the best didactical attempt (known to me)
LISTEN TO THIS TRICKY LITTLE POEM AND YOU CAN PRACTISE YOUR PRONUNCIATION AND LISTENING SKILLS, AND 
DON'T WORRY IF YOU DON'T KNOW ALL THE WORDS AND THEIR DIFFERENT PRONUNCIATION. EVEN LYNNE GOT ARKANSAS WRONG THE FIRST TIME ROUND! 
IN FACT, THIS WAS THE FIRST POEM LYNNE EVER RECORDED FOR THE SITE, AND SHE'S RE-RECORDED IT THREE TIMES NOW, JUST TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY.


Saturday, December 17, 2016

The spiders' house -Bowles and Arabic

“There is a truth for everyone, and no one truth carries away all the others.”                Paul Bowles

in Gina Dagel Caponi (1993) Conversations with Paul Bowles 
 
Bowles was eager to get immersed into the North African exotic culture. It nurtured himwith fresh material from an exotic culture. What are the distorted mirrors of his prism?
LEXICON  by   S. J. Altoma The Journal of North African Studies 164-172


Bowles is specifically credited for his pioneering effort to promote numerous Moroccan works he translated or adapted from Arabic and the Moroccan vernacular or ‘Moghrebi’ as he called it. What is unique about his role is the fact that he had no knowledge of Arabic and the fact that his command of Moroccan Arabic was questionable or less than adequate for him to undertake his translation projects without the use of an intermediary language. This essay will address both issues mainly on the basis of personal conversations I had with Mr Bowles in Tangier and a review of the Arabic words or phrases he used in his works. It will show that because of his lack of knowledge of Arabic, Bowles was led to maintain distorted views of the Arabic language and its literary and cultural heritage.



The Journal Of North African Studies Vol. 17 , Iss. 1,2012

American writer who sought to represent not only the views of his Moroccan characters but also their native-spoken idiom.

Comments marked by (A) at the end of selected entries represent Alami’s view as a native speaker of Fez dialect. 


  • ‘lah imsik bekheir/ Good night
  • Aachor Anniversary of the death of al-Husayn, the Prophet’s grand son. Aallem/Muslim scholar, man of learning.
  • Abaden!: Never
  • Ach haddou laillaha illa’ Allah: I witness there is no God but Allah Adoul: legal scribes, clerk of the court. 
  • Abaden!: Never
  • Ach haddou laillaha illa’ Allah: I witness there is no God but Allah Adoul: legal scribes, clerk of the court.
  • Abaden!: Never
  • Ach haddou laillaha illa’ Allah: I witness there is no God but Allah Adoul: legal scribes, clerk of the court.
  • Affarit 1⁄4 afreet demon .places where evil spirits, djenoun and affarit abounded. . .
  • Agi agi [come] agi menah! Come here! Agi ts’awouni! Come help me!
  • Ahilan? Ahlan? Hello
  • Ahouache A Berber ceremony of the Anti-Atlas mountains that involves groups of dancers,
  • singers etc. . . A ̈ıd: feast
  • A ̈ıd el Arche: The Feast of the Throne/King of Morocco’s coronation
  • A ̈ıd el Kebir: celebrates the culmination of the pilgrimage to Mecca
  • A ̈ıd el Seghir: the end of Ramadan/the month of Muslim Fasting-
  • Aissa
  • Aissa
  • Aissa/sidna aissa “taking care to keep Jesus distinct from the Moslem prophet Sidna Aissa” PB. Aissoua: A Sufi brotherhood named after its founder Sidi Muhammad ben Aissa Akchil/khlass men d’akchi “Just tell me that much and then shut up” PB.
  • Allah Akbar: God Is Great
  • Allah istir: God help us
  • Alleche/O alleche? For what? Why?
  • Amara: Festival in commemoration of a Muslim saint.
  • Ana? me ?Ana m’khallesik:[without/s/] I’ll pay. [I won’t let you]
  • Andaluz music: [Moroccan Andalusian music]
  • Ankabutz 1⁄4 ankabut: spider
  • Annah! Me!
  • Aoudas? Plural of oud? “Sometimes the men have fires and play songs on their aoudas” PB.
  • Annah! Me!
  • Aoudas? Plural of oud? “Sometimes the men have fires and play songs on their aoudas” PB.

  • Bab el guissa? [The name of a historical gate in the old medina of Fes]
  • Bab fteuh: Bab al-futuh? [A neighborhood in the nortrh eastern part of the Medina of Fes. It is
  • also the name of one of the historical gates of the old medina.]A
  • Bab mahrouk [the name of one of the historical gates in the old Medina of Fes]A
  • Babouches: slippers
  • Bacal! Grocery shop “she ran a bacal” PB.
  • Bakhour: incense
  • Balek: watch out
  • Baqal, Baqqal grocer, grocery shop
  • Baraka: blessing, quality possessed by holy men.
  • Baraka’llahoufik/ thank you:May God bless you.
  • Bastela: A Moroccan lozenge-shaped meat pie, covered in fillo dough
  • Baz! That’s perfect! [Expression of disbelief or surprise]A
  • B’cif: “of course”? [Hardly, perforce] A
  • B’d draa
  • Bastela: A Moroccan lozenge-shaped meat pie, covered in fillo dough
  • Baz! That’s perfect! [Expression of disbelief or surprise]A
  • B’cif: “of course”? [Hardly, perforce] A
  • B’d draa/ b’d drah 1⁄4 b’drab? : it’s got to by force
  • Beid el beita f’kerr el hmar “a white egg in a donkey’s anus” PB [Lay an egg in a donkey’s ass]
  • Beid el beita f’kerr el hmar “a white egg in a donkey’s anus” PB [Lay an egg in a donkey’s ass]
  • 1⁄4beid el beida
  • Bel haq true, in truth
  • Belarhlikslem bzef: [meaning “baligh lak salam” i.e. sends you his greetings]A Belgha
  • Bel haq true, in truth
  • Belarhlikslem bzef: [meaning “baligh lak salam” i.e. sends you his greetings]A Belgha/an old pair of belgha:slippers
  • Bendir : tabor [a wooden frame drum with a membrane with two strings]A.
  • Berrada: jug
  • Berrani: outsider, stranger.
  • B’es-sahh (true)
  • Bhar el hamar? [I think he means bhal
  • Bendir : tabor [a wooden frame drum with a membrane with two strings]A.
  • Berrada: jug
  • Berrani: outsider, stranger.
  • B’es-sahh (true)
  • Bhar el hamar? [I think he means bhal. . .i.e. like a donkey (stupid)]
  • Bileche tabousni fi aynayah [from Abd al-Wahhab’s song] “why do you kiss me on the
  • Bileche tabousni fi aynayah [from Abd al-Wahhab’s song] “why do you kiss me on the
  • eyelids?”/152
  • Binatzkoum
  • Binatzkoum 1⁄4 binatkoum “that’s between you and them”/260
  • Bismil’lah ala maketseb allah 115 Bismilla (in the name of Gad) for what God has provided us
  • Bismil’lah ala maketseb allah 115 Bismilla (in the name of Gad) for what God has provided us
  • with
  • Bismillah in the name of God/ Bismillah rahman er rahim
  • Bit el Qots
  • Bit el Qots1⁄4 Bayt al-Quds Jerusalem Bled: the land/the country/countryside Bordj: fort/guard-post
  • B’sah? “really”
  • B’slemah: goodbye
  • Burnouses: hooded cloaks
  • B’sah? “really”
  • B’slemah: goodbye
  • Burnouses: hooded cloaks

  • Cabrhozels: a kind of pastry? Ordered two teas and two cabrhozels.
  • Caid 1⁄4 Qa’id) Chief. Local tribal chief. A term also used for an administrator or government
  • official.
  • Casbah, Kasbah:fortress, Muslim section of a town
  • Ch’ andek? What’s the matter with you? [what’s wrong? Used in the north Tangier and
  • Tetouan]A.
  • Chaikhat singing girls and dancers
  • Chechia: straw hat
  • Chehada: the brief profession of faith, see his use of ach haddou laillaha illa’ Allah
  • Cheikh, Cheikhs/chikh: elder, wise man, a title of respect, a leader of a group, such as “of a
  • group- of folk muscicians”.
  • Chemel: North, Rif.
  • Cherqi: eastern wind.
  • Chibb: [a kind of incense]A
  • Chkama, informers. I have seen a lot of chkama. . . Most drari like you end up by turning
  • informer; that’s not unuusal.
  • Chkhbarek? how are you?
  • Chkoun: Who/who’s there?
  • Chleuh the generic Moroccan term for Berbers.Specifically it refers to the Sousis Chnou bghitisi ts’qoulli: What did you do want to tell me?
  • Chleuh the generic Moroccan term for Berbers.Specifically it refers to the Sousis Chnou bghitisi ts’qoulli: What did you do want to tell me?
  • Chnou hada? “what are you doing?” or: [what’s this]A.
  • Chnou hadek el haraj? What is that noise? [Disturbance/commotion]A.
  • Chnou?“ what?
  • Chorfa (pl.of cherif) descendents of the Prophet)
  • Choual: the month of Shawwal: 10th month of the Islamic calendar.
  • Chouf: see, look
  • Chouwal: choual Shawwal
  • Chqaf/chqofa “he smoked many chqofa. . . he blew the hard ash out of the chqaf” PB. [the small
  • bowl of the Moroccan pipe called “sebsi.” The chqaf is filled up with cannabis or kif] Chta: rain
  • Cirf halak/Cir fhallak/Go away

  • Dahir: Sultan’s Decree. “I shouldn’t be surprised if there were a dahir prohibiting ever those simple subsitututes for partaking of sustenance” PB.
  • Darbou? Beat it/alleche bghitsidarbou? Khallih [why do you want to beat/hit him? Leave him]A.
  • Darbouka large ceramic hand drum. Deba labes enta? You feel better? Dem: howling “ed dem”!“blood” Derb: neighberhood, alley.
  • Derb el Heurra? (181) [the name of a street in of Fes]A.
  • Derri: child
  • Dirhams: Moroccan currency
  • Djaoui A resin incense, of a hard and rock-like appearance
  • Djebala: straight from the mountains [inhabitants of the mountainous area called djebala] Djebel Zalagh [the name of the mountain that overlooks the Medina of Fes from the north. It is also the beginning of the Rif mountains]
  • Djellaba/djellabas Traditional Moroccan long-sleeved burnous/garment with hood. [worn by both men and women]A.
  • Djemaa andaluz: andalus mosque.
  • Djenane es Sebir: Garden in Fes.
  • Djibli: peasant (perjorative) [from Jbala (from Arabic Jbel/ mountain). Djibli is an inhabitant of
  • Jbala, the north-western region of Morocco)A.
  • Djinn, djinniya (f) djenoun (plural): jinn, evil spirit
  • Drbouka Large ceramic hand drum used in traditional music. Drissiyine (descendents of the first dynasty) [Idrissids] 
  • Echkoun Who?
  • Ed dounia mamzianche: the world was very bad, lit: the world is not good Egless: sit
  • Eheud Incense associated with Moroccan Jews
  • El aidek mabrouk: holiday greetings
  • El hassil: Anyway
  • En noua(he had en noua)he knew that was a bad disease
  • Enta hmuq bzef: you’re very crazy
  • Enta m’douagh, he said with disgust. You’re crazy.
  • Entina ketsfham hsin minn hnaya:you understand better than we do Entina ouahad rajel hsin: you are a fine man
  • Er rabi mabrhach God does’nt want it easy [God does/did not want it] Essbar: wait.
  • Essmah Listen 
  • Fasoukh: incense, of gummy texture, used to drive away sorcerers and malevolent spirits Fasoukh and other incenses: I’m going to buy fasoukh and tib and nidd, and hasalaba and mske
  • and all the bakhour in the Djmaa, and put them in the mijmah? And burn them. Fejr: Islamic dawn prayer
  • Fel louwil first
  • Fellah, fellahin: peasant, farmer
  • Fhemti? Did/do you understand
  • Fik ej jeuhor? Hungry?
  • Fik ej jeuhor? Hungry?/. [It should be: fik ju’]A.
  • Filfil: pepper
  • Fjer: dawn
  • Flouss:Generic term for money
  • Filfil: pepper
  • Fjer: dawn
  • Flouss:Generic term for money/small change
  • Fondaq
  • Fondaq/fondouq: “during the French occupation fondouq and fondaq were used interchnageably
  • to mean ‘hostelry’; present-day usage distinguishes bewteen a fondouq-a caravanserai where
  • animal are accommodated- and a fondaq, a hotel”. (Points in Time, 92). Foundouk, fondouq: hotel
  • Fqih: holy man, religious scholar
  • Fraja: I was watching the fraja: mass dancing [the spectacle]A.
  • Fqih: holy man, religious scholar
  • Fraja: I was watching the fraja: mass dancing [the spectacle]A.
  • Gandoura: Long dress worn by both sexes. [Ghandoura is a traditional loosely fitting sleeveless garment similar to djellaba but without hood]A 
  • Gnaoua or gennaoua quasi-mystical brotherhood of blacks, known for dancing and sorcery. From the Tuareg agnaw“black”
  • Gourba: [jug, jar]A 
  • Guinbri: A Rustic flute, Plucked lute-like instrument [Also known as Guembri which is a three- stringed instrument, like a lute, with a body made of log and covered with animal skin usually played by the Gnawa people.]A.
  • Guirch: piaster?
  • Gzara (at the feet of the gzara) butcher

  • Hachouma: shame
  • Hada echouf This one sees.
  • Hadji: pilgrim
  • Haik: [a traditional outer garment consisting of a large piece of cloth worn by women. It covers
  • the woman from head to foot with only the eyes showing]A. Haiti: traditional Moroccan wall-covering
  • Hamdou’llah Praise Be to God
  • Hammam: bathhouse
  • Hanout, hanoute: store. shop
  • Haouma: quarter “she [the Jewish woman] began to tell..that the Moslems in her haouma had
  • bought charms to use against her daughter” PB.
  • Haram sin prohibited see also Hachouma shame. “Shame and Sin were the most useful words in
  • the common people’s vocabulary” PB.
  • Harami: dishoest one, thief
  • Harira: Moroccan soup
  • Haroun- al -Rachid: “Some sort of native dramatic company which is presenting Haroun-al-
  • Raschid at Fez and soon at Tanger. (In Touch 89 from a letter October or November 1931 to
  • Aaron Copland).
  • Hasaluban Gum incense.frankincense.
  • Haschich: /hashish
  • Hasira: woven-grass mat
  • Hassil,el: anyway
  • H’dia “gift” he had the h’dia, the gift.
  • Hekaya: story;tale
  • Hindiyats :pricky pears[cactus fruit]
  • Hmuq: Crazy.
  • Horm: took sanctuary inside the horm of Moulay Idriss: holy enclosure Huwa hada It is this one
  • Hasira: woven-grass mat
  • Hassil,el: anyway
  • H’dia “gift” he had the h’dia, the gift.
  • Hekaya: story;tale
  • Hindiyats :pricky pears[cactus fruit]
  • Hmuq: Crazy.
  • Horm: took sanctuary inside the horm of Moulay Idriss: holy enclosure Huwa hada It is this one 
  • Imam: Prayer leader
  • Ikoun: be
  • inchaAllah,incha’Allah: God willing.
  • Inch’Allah rahman er rahim [Inhsa’Allah and some Moroccan add rahman rahim i.e Most Gracious, Most Merciful]A.
  • Istiqlal Independence, refers to Moroccan independence from French/Spanish colonialism in
  • 1956. Also Moroccan Independence Party:Hizb al-Istiqlal. 
  • Jaffar name 1⁄4ja’far I said “Si Jaffar. . .
  • Jaou
  • Jaou/menene jaou? From where did they come? Jiaou “they came”
  • jduq jmel Literally “camel’s cud” A hallucinogenic plant. [Correct spelling: “Shdeq” jmel] Jehennam: hell “Allah’s most terrible punishment this side of the fires of jehennem”.
  • Jiffa: carrion
  • jduq jmel Literally “camel’s cud” A hallucinogenic plant. [Correct spelling: “Shdeq” jmel] Jehennam: hell “Allah’s most terrible punishment this side of the fires of jehennem”.
  • Jiffa: carrion
  • Jihad,: “The man meant, jihad, the wholesale slaughter by every Moslem of all available unbleivers(The Spider’s House 46-47)
  • Jilala Religious brotherhood. Name refers to “glory” of God as well as to the twelfth-century saint of Baghdad Abd el-Qadir el-Jilani or “Jilali”. 
  • Kabila, tribe
  • Kadah, Du El Kadah: 1⁄4 Dhu al-Qa’dah 11th month in the Islamic calendar.
  • Kaffirine: unbelievers, heathens..
  • Kaftan a long sleeved outer garment, see also Qaftan below
  • Kamenja: violin, fiddle
  • Katib: clerk, Secretary
  • Kdoub: lie
  • Keddane [the name of a neighborhood in old medina of Fes in the Andalusian quarter]A. Khabaeuh:put it away please,hide it
  • Kaffirine: unbelievers, heathens..
  • Kaftan a long sleeved outer garment, see also Qaftan below
  • Kamenja: violin, fiddle
  • Katib: clerk, Secretary
  • Kdoub: lie
  • Keddane [the name of a neighborhood in old medina of Fes in the Andalusian quarter]A. Khabaeuh:put it away please,hide it/him
  • Khai brother
  • Khalatini” you frightened me.
  • khalifa Government official; assistant to a caid, a deputy official
  • Khalih leave him alone
  • Khamstache fifteen
  • Khaouf: fear
  • Khai brother
  • Khalatini” you frightened me.
  • khalifa Government official; assistant to a caid, a deputy official
  • Khalih leave him alone
  • Khamstache fifteen
  • Khaouf: fear/Fi el khaouf :I’m afraid.
  • Kharra Shit.Moroccan vulgarity
  • Khlass: Stop it
  • Khoya: brother
  • Kif: Cannabis sativa The fine leaves at the base of the flowers of the common hemp plant,-
  • Kharra Shit.Moroccan vulgarity
  • Khlass: Stop it
  • Khoya: brother
  • Kif: Cannabis sativa The fine leaves at the base of the flowers of the common hemp plant,-
  • Cannabis sativa,chopped fine and usually mixed with tobacco grown in the same soil. Kif enta? How are you?
  • Kifach: enough?
  • Kiffed smoked kif (under the influence of kif)
  • Kissaria: the quarter of the souk devoted to the sale of textiles, clothing and luxury items. Kouffa: basket 1⁄4Arabic quffa [A Morrocan bag made out of reeds]A.
  • Ksar: p-alace.
  • Ksour Fortified villages.Usually in southern Morocco.
  • Ksar: p-alace.
  • Ksour Fortified villages.Usually in southern Morocco. 
  • La,khoya,la no brother no
  • Labess: Fine, well
  • Latif/yah latif : gentle ya latif: O My God! Latif is also a form of public prayer in a mosque. Lirah : cane flute
  • Litham: veil, the cloth worn over the lower half of a woman’s face. “they [nationalists] hoped to
  • Litham: veil, the cloth worn over the lower half of a woman’s face. “they [nationalists] hoped to
  • induce them[women] to discard the litham, and show their faces openly,like Jewesses or Christians” PB.
  • Loulli/prayer of the- [The mid-day prayer of Dhuhr] A

  • Maallem “Good maallem” Master
  • Maferhanche bzef: not happy at all
  • Maghreb al Aqsa’: was the name of the country
  • Maghreb, Morocco: afternoon prayer
  • Majabekfina: Don’t worry about me.. [You do not have anything to do with us. None of your
  • Maferhanche bzef: not happy at all
  • Maghreb al Aqsa’: was the name of the country
  • Maghreb, Morocco: afternoon prayer
  • Majabekfina: Don’t worry about me.. [You do not have anything to do with us. None of your
  • business]A

  • Majoun: Jam. Here made of figs and powdered cannabis: sometimes mixed with hashish oil. Mamelouah(it’s forbidden) ?
  • Mamil 1⁄4 ma`mal/shop/factory “let’s see if you can run the mamil” PB.
  • Mcid: Tangier pronunciation of msjid, primary school attached to a mosque. [Also in Fes]A Mechoui
  • Mcid: Tangier pronunciation of msjid, primary school attached to a mosque. [Also in Fes]A Mechoui/mchoui the greatest delicacy of the Southern Territory, Barbeque,usually of an entire
  • sheep)
  • Medersa karouine : qarawiyyin: school or college and mosque in Fez.
  • Medersa: Qur’anic/religious school
  • Medina: city [older traditional quarter of city]A
  • Mehari: camel
  • Mehboul: idiot
  • Mejdoub: insane, possessed, deranged person believed to be possessed by spirits.
  • Mektoub It is writte, destiny
  • Melhoun(qsida) The language in which qsidas, poetic odes,are usually sung. [Also Malhoun:
  • Medina: city [older traditional quarter of city]A
  • Mehari: camel
  • Mehboul: idiot
  • Mejdoub: insane, possessed, deranged person believed to be possessed by spirits.
  • Mektoub It is writte, destiny
  • Melhoun(qsida) The language in which qsidas, poetic odes,are usually sung. [Also Malhoun:
  • Moroccan music based on Qasida of a melodic poem that is organized around stanzas and a refrain called “harba”. Originally it started in Tafilalet (south east Morocco) and flourished in historical cities, namely Fes, Meknes and Marrakech]A.
  • Mellah: Jewish quarters
  • Menene jaoui? O alleche? Where did they come from? And why?
  • Merhmoum? 1⁄4mehmoum?: sad . Gallik merhmoum bzef. It is very sad.
  • Metallem:[I am only a
  • Metallem:[I am only a metallem apprentice]
  • Meziane delightful. good.
  • Mijmah (
  • Meziane delightful. good.
  • Mijmah (1⁄4mijmar) a terra-cotta brazier, censor [correct spelling is mijmar]A
  • M’kiyif smoked kif :under the influence of kif
  • Mkiyif ma rassou: [High on smoked cannabis
  • M’kiyif smoked kif :under the influence of kif
  • Mkiyif ma rassou: [High on smoked cannabis/marijuana]A.
  • Moghrebi: Moroccan
  • Mokhazni, mokhaznia: Soldier, government official
  • Mokhfia, El [makhfiyya?] [the name of a quarter
  • Moghrebi: Moroccan
  • Mokhazni, mokhaznia: Soldier, government official
  • Mokhfia, El [makhfiyya?] [the name of a quarter/neighborhood in medina of Fes]A. Moqaddam Gauleioter of quarter or village;local head of religious brotherhood.
  • Moqaddem official title
  • Mottoui : leather purse for kif [ Correct spelling is Matwi: the leather case that holds the finely
  • Moqaddem official title
  • Mottoui : leather purse for kif [ Correct spelling is Matwi: the leather case that holds the finely
  • clipped pieces of kif/cannabis.]A
  • Mouiddin -Mouiddin/Muezzin prayer caller.
  • moul: master,owner
  • Moulana: Our Lord, God. “Only Moulana knows how next year will be” PB.
  • Moulay: Master, Lord, a title of respect, often reserved for one who is a cherif, or descendent of
  • moul: master,owner
  • Moulana: Our Lord, God. “Only Moulana knows how next year will be” PB.
  • Moulay: Master, Lord, a title of respect, often reserved for one who is a cherif, or descendent of
  • the Prophet.
  • Mouloud Prophet’s birthday celebration (Aid al-Mouloud); also used for a saint’s birthday
  • celebration.
  • Moussem: fair, Seasonal festival held at the tomb of a saint.
  • Mouwal : mawwal
  • Mroziya Meat baked with honey [–prepared with lamb and raisins, especially during Aid al-
  • Adha]A.
  • Msalkheir: Good afternoon [good evening] A M’ska: Gum arabic for incense.
  • Muezzin see Mouiddin 
  • Na’als sandals
  • Naam, sidi: yes.sir .
  • Naqous: bell, a percussion instrument
  • Narghile: water-pipe
  • Nazarene: Christian
  • Nchoufou menbad: we’ll see you later
  • Nesrani: Christian
  • Nimchi o nji" [ I’ll go and come back]A.
  • Nimchiou: let’s go.
  • N’khalleslik" it’s on me" [I will pay]A 
  • Om Kalsoum(1⁄4Umm Kulthum): Most famous Egyptian singer.
  • Oua-a-l ach f’n nebbi
  • Oua-a-l ach f’n nebbi/selliou alih/oual’laah m’selli alih/karrasoul’llah(a pilgrim’s prayer?"/
  • [spiritual sayings in praise of the prophet very commonly used in most Moroccan celebra-
  • tions.]A.
  • Ouahira? Difficult? “Ed dounia ouahira,” he said. “The world is a difficult place.” Ouakha: yes OK.
  • Ouallah? Swear to God, by God
  • Oud: ‘ud musical instrument “he could hear the high thin notes of the oud”
  • Oued: Stream bed or watercourse, usually dry.
  • Ouled Nail: Berber singing girls and courtesans from the Aures mountains of Algeria. Pacha rank[ Local governor]

  • Qachla?: Garrison
  • Qaftan: a long sleeved outer garment
  • Qahwaji/qaouaji: Coffeehouse owner, see also qaouji
  • Qalaoui
  • Qalaoui/ “in the police station where they woud attach electrodes to his qalaoui-/ Testicles” PB Qaouji: waiter, coffehouse owner
  • Qoadi: qadi: A Muslim judge who rules on the basis of Islamic law.
  • Qsbah: Large reed transverse flute with a low register.
  • Qsida: qasida a poem
  • Qulb ? Qalb heart. «They have a passion for falling back on the « heart » in explaining a thing. El
  • Qoadi: qadi: A Muslim judge who rules on the basis of Islamic law.
  • Qsbah: Large reed transverse flute with a low register.
  • Qsida: qasida a poem
  • Qulb ? Qalb heart. «They have a passion for falling back on the « heart » in explaining a thing. El
  • Qulb they whisper. . . In Touch 182».

  • Rabi
  • Rabi/ya rabi [1⁄4, rabb, rabbi] /God
  • Rais: head
  • Raita (datura)Hallucinogenic plant
  • Razzia: “the raids proliferated, each razzia was attributed to the ghosts of the Medaganat” PB Reales, Silver
  • Rais: head
  • Raita (datura)Hallucinogenic plant
  • Razzia: “the raids proliferated, each razzia was attributed to the ghosts of the Medaganat” PB Reales, Silver reales 1⁄4 riyal a silver coin
  • Rebab: Violen-like instrument with one to three strings, played with a bow, .rebec, fiddle Rebtas: tin of kif
  • Reguibat: Nomadic tribespeople from the Western Sahara
  • Rhaddi noud el haraj men deba chouich "it’s going to be war this time, not just games” PB Rhaita: An oboe-like reed instrument. [Ghaytah a double-reed instrument like a flute]A.

  • Sa’a, sa’a: sometimes, I come and stay a few days. Safi/: done, enough
  • Safsaf trees: eucalyptus. poplar trees or weeping willows Sahel, sahel: easy
  • Safsaf trees: eucalyptus. poplar trees or weeping willows Sahel, sahel: easy
  • Sala: hall
  • Salaam ou aleikoum: peace be upon you, greetings
  • Salaamed (derivative of salaam) “they salaamed in unison facing the empty hammada” PB Salaams: greetings
  • Saqqaya [water fountain]A
  • Sabahal kheir, Sbalkheir: good morning
  • Sebsi: long thin pipe for smoking kif [Morrocan pipe made out of a clay or reed to smoke
  • cannabis/kif]A
  • Seguia: stream
  • Semsar: broker, agent middle man
  • Serrouelles: trousers
  • Shish kebab
  • Sidi Boukhari “district in Tangier"
  • Sidi Kacem Town in northwest Morocco
  • Skout: shut up.
  • Skse huwa [ask him]
  • s’l’m aleikoum: peace be upon you, i.e greeting) [sends his greetings to you]A Smahli: I’m sorry [excuse me]A
  • Smatsi: Listen
  • Smitsck? What is your name?
  • Souk, souks: market
  • Souq: souk
  • Seguia: stream
  • Semsar: broker, agent middle man
  • Serrouelles: trousers
  • Shish kebab
  • Sidi Boukhari “district in Tangier"
  • Sidi Kacem Town in northwest Morocco
  • Skout: shut up.
  • Skse huwa [ask him]
  • s’l’m aleikoum: peace be upon you, i.e greeting) [sends his greetings to you]A Smahli: I’m sorry [excuse me]A
  • Smatsi: Listen
  • Smitsck? What is your name?
  • Souk, souks: market
  • Souq: souk 
  • Taguia: small Muslim skull-cap
  • Tajine [Moroccan pot made of clay and the dish that is cooked in it]A
  • Tanja: Tangier
  • Tanja Alia: the great Tangier [a very popular song about Tangier literally: “Tangier the high] A Tarbouche: fez
  • T’barak’ Allah :God bless
  • Tchamir [a traditional Moroccan garment similar to Ghandourah, usually convenient to wear at
  • home]A
  • Tib, nidd, basalouban and mska and the bakhour [names of different incences associated with
  • repelling magic spells]
  • Tlah: Go Up
  • Tolba: “students” usually professional Qur’an reciters
  • Toubib: doctor
  • Ts’awouni/agi agi ts’awouni! (ta’awouni without /s/Help me
  • Tseuheur (
  • Tseuheur (1⁄4 sheur form sihr) Generic term for magic specifically it is word and sympathetic.
  • magic
  • Tsoukil (1⁄4 toukal) Euphemism for poison [He means “tawkal” i.e. feeding someone food or
  • drink that contains some magically prepared potion or poison in order to make him/her love you and be submissive] 
  • Ulema: religious leaders, scholars

  • Wattanine: patriots “Now he understood the Wattanine whom the French called les terrorists and les assassins” PB.
  • Wazzara? ..the son chose his wazzara who would paint the designs . . .build the wall. Ya altif! My God
  • Ya ouilidi: my boy, my son
  • Yallah: let’s go
  • Ya ouilidi: my boy, my son
  • Yallah: let’s go
  • Yehoudi: Jew. “Chouf had l’yehoudi. Look at that Jew!” PB Yehoudia: Jewess, Judaism
  • Yemkin, yimkin: possible, maybe. 
  • Zamar: Riffian double reed musical instrument.
  • Zaouia: zawiyah Holy shrine, Seat of a religious brotherhood, genrally comprising a mosque, a
  • school and the tomb of the sect’s founder.
  • Zduq: right, correct
  • Zekak er Roumane [zqaq al-romaan: the name of a street/quarter in old Medina in Fes.]A 
  • Zouamel’: “So they were not women at all; they were merely dresses as girls” [Moroccan for gays (especially the passive]A.
  • Zqaq: alley, street.