Search This Blog

Thursday, May 10, 2018

It needn’t be a WESTERNcentric world




A matter of perspective: 



A perspective from US: does it matter?




Using the compass to orientate:  
Arabia (Ancient): They put south at the top. This is because when you wake up and face the sun, south is on the right. Because of positive associations with the right as opposed to left, they put that on top.
Europeans learnt mapmaking from the Arabians and flipped the map to make themselves on top.
Medieval Europe: Jerusalem was on top because that was the Holy Land. This meant that east was more or less at the top.
It needn’t be a Eurocentric world -
 McArthur's map -1979


MEDITERRANIAN: The best Catalan map 1375 
-made in Mallorca    by  Abraham Cresques 

«Cresques lo juhueu qui lo dit mapamundi a fet»

"Les cartes portolanes: la representació medieval d'una mar solcada",  a body of knowledge regarding the map-makers of Majorca of the late middle ages that had not obtained the recognition it deserves in the English-speaking cartographical research world.


 Crescques was the first to draw an ornate compass rose on a map. By the end of the 15th century, Portuguese cartographers began drawing multiple ornate compass roses throughout the chart.
His son, Jafuda (Jehuda) , dues to the Crown persecutions of 1391 converted to Christianity, at which time he took the name Jaume Riba, Jacobus Ribus,
Despite the map's rather approximate cartographical design, which emphasize the earth's spherical shape and the state of the known world, many Indian and Chinese cities can be identified. The explanatory texts report customs described by Marco Polo and catalogue local economic resources, real ones or supposed ones. This, indeed, is perhaps the most interesting aspect of the Catalan Atlas : to the east of the well-defined Mediterranean world lie immense regions whose economic importance is clearly understood, but which remain mysterious and unexplored. This world of spices, silks, and fabulous riches described by Marco Polo is the one that Christopher Columbus would attempt to reach by a western route 117 years later.



Everybody makes mistakes sometimes....




Yanko Tsetkov -map of prejudice:


AND

Martin's Positive stereotypes: such as ‘Japanese and Koreans are all very smart’, ‘the French are very romantic’, and ‘all Canadians are polite.’”

Click an pick up your negative ones  

   mapping stereotypes



or Independence day!



But no-one can fool everybody everytime!
Columbus gets a lot of flak for mistaken the Americas for India, but c'mon, the guy couldn't exactly consult GPS and Google. 

My fav goofs


  • George W. Bush: 
  • "Africa is a nation that suffers from incredible disease.”  
  • Paris Hilton 
  • “I love Africa in general. South Africa and West Africa. They are both great countries.” 
  • Britney Spears 
  • "I've never really wanted to go to Japan. Simply because I don't like eating fish. And I know that's very popular out there in Africa."


WR - essay on RACE relations and cultural relativity


Have a go at a couple of racing up writing tasks:

WRITING task_101-Essay 
 
WRITING task_102-Summary 

1) WRITING  task_101-ESSAY (275 words) on the topic:

  Distorted perceptions? they are racist, neither are us.

What has caused that large divergence in attitudes? How can certain portrayals of black people be blatant racism in one country and totally matter-of-fact in another?  

Can we still play with semantics and words as in Marx quote: "Include me out!", Groucho of course ?


Taking the topic with a stern face, think of Media, TV series, woman in power, confronting power, etc in your country.  Include these:

  •  a question for the reader, 
  • a couple of examples, 
  • a quotation and 
  • a powerful ending. 



info 1. Have you heard about this picture on the right (piece of news ,CNN )


info 2. VIDEO YOUTUBE .  CONGUITOS
Upon visiting a corner store in Malaga we were shocked to discover a Sambo statue at the check out section. After further research these videos and screen shots show that this company has been spreading racial hatred towards African people since 1961. Lets End Racism. Many friends of ours cry when they see images like these while thousands if not millions of people see this propaganda as harmless.

info 3. 

Read the entry from a mag article:
a) the publicity for the theatre show Cómeme el coco, negro festooned the streets of the city, the sides of buses and walls of metro stations, portraying a cartoonish black face with a wide-mouthed grin and large white lips. The show, by Catalan company La Cubana, was a revival of a production they put on when they formed over 25 years ago. “It would be a lie to say that Spain isn’t racist, but it’s not this,” the director of the Cubana company said,  “The problem isn’t with us, it’s with you.” 
b) Ana Arango, an anthropologist from Colombia who has lived in Barcelona for three years,  wrote in her blog in November 2007  " the image is a characterisation that ridicules the African aesthetic, done by a company that isn’t African."





FOLLOW UP:

Did you know....
In the 1940-45 battle for homeland morale, American propaganda makers depicted Germany in a very different light than Japan -link: 
  • Germany was seen as a great nation gone mad. The Nazis might have been evil but there was still room for the “Good German.” 
  •  Japan, on the other hand, was depicted entirely as a brutal monolith .....   ...  ... US propagandists was to liken the Japanese to animals like snakes and rats.



===== 

WRITING  TASK-102. 
Summarise the article below. (175 words)

For a modern update about 1940 at war... LINK

   ...  US propagandists was to liken the Japanese to animals like snakes and rats.

A Critical Comparison Between Japanese and American 
Propaganda during World War II. 

 Anthony V. Navarro 

    The affects of propaganda, however, last well after treaties are signed and the dusts of war settle. Japan, though defeated, still held inside the same hatred for the United States it had before the war if not more so.  They played the role of defeated foe, smiling to appease their victors on the outside but contemptuous and demoralized on the inside. The United States still often referred to the Japanese as “Japs” or other racially derogatory names.  The words and images left to us by propaganda remain in a nation's collective memory.  They are vestiges of war-time.  However good or bad, those memories linger in culture.  The elements of war are not left on the battle field to wither away with those who perished.  Hate, anger, and contempt are brought home so that “war” becomes no longer a job but a way of life. 





ARTICLE -racing races and the underdog -CULTURAL DIVIDE



METROPOLITAN -BCN MAGAZINE  -

June 2008

They say a picture paints a thousand words—with so much to say, a single image can be interpreted in ways that are poles apart. A case in point was seen recently in Barcelona: 
between November 2007 and last month, the publicity for the theatre show Cómeme el coco, negro festooned the streets of the city, the sides of buses and walls of metro stations, portraying a cartoonish black face with a wide-mouthed grin and large white lips. The show, by Catalan company La Cubana, was a revival of a production they put on when they formed over 25 years ago.

To the members of the company, the audiences watching night after night and, apparently, many of those who saw this image around them, there was nothing objectionable about it. The director of the show, Jordi Milán, told Metropolitan that he could see nothing wrong with it, that it was a “modern concept”, and he was shocked and angered at the suggestion that it might be offensive.
“It would be a lie to say that Spain isn’t racist, but it’s not this,” he said, questioning why North Americans and Britons should expect other countries to be the same as theirs when it comes to such matters. “The problem isn’t with us, it’s with you.”
Milán said that black people had been to see the show and not had a problem with it (indeed, there is a black person performing in it, taking a role that in the original version was played by a white person with a blacked-up face). However, he also admitted that when the show started he received a letter from a black American woman saying that she felt insulted by La Cubana’s poster.
Concern was also voiced by Ana María Arango, an anthropologist from Colombia who has lived in Barcelona for three years. She wrote in her blog in November 2007 that the image is a characterisation that ridicules the African aesthetic, done by a company that isn’t African. She told Metropolitan, people in Spain don’t think in these terms. “Here, there doesn’t yet exist consciousness about the damage that stereotypes can do in the day-to-day life of people of African descent.”
What has caused this divergence in attitudes? How can certain portrayals of black people be blatant racism in one country and totally matter-of-fact in another? This gulf is something that foreign residents from places including the UK or North America quickly become familiar with in Spain, finding themselves confronted with images that have been socially unacceptable in their home countries for many years. A visit to the local supermarket, for example, brings one face-to-face with tubs of Cola Cao chocolate powder, illustrated by two smiling black people collecting cocoa pods. In the next aisle is the chocolate Conguitos, with a logo of a dark brown pygmy-like character with a perfectly round head, equally round body and (on some products) disproportionately large red lips.
Expatica.com blogger Sal DeTraglia, originally from the US, wrote in 2006 of his “bittersweet love affair” with Conguitos—on the one hand, he couldn’t get enough of the “irresistible chocolate peanuts”, but on the other, while not wanting to pass judgement, DeTraglia expressed his “uneasiness with the branding” (and such uneasiness would -in all likelihood- be much greater had he seen the figure before it was ‘updated’ and his spear removed).
When DeTraglia asked a Spanish friend whether she thought the figure was offensive, she didn’t understand what he meant at first. After some consideration, she told him, “I never really thought about it. The Conguitos cartoon has been around since before I was born.”
Her comment seems to encapsulate Spanish attitudes towards such images and portrayals of African people—they have never challenged or questioned them, but apparently simply take them at face value, denying any racist connotations. “People don’t give it the importance that it deserves because of ‘unawareness’,” Begoña Sánchez, spokeswoman of anti-racism organisation SOS Racisme, told Metropolitan.
 
In contrast, those countries that have had a slave trade, colonies and oppressive laws against one part of the population due to racial differences, and where such images were once a common cultural feature, cannot claim unawareness. From the 15th century, when Europeans started exploring African countries, occupying them and trading the locals as slaves, the notion of the indigenous people as ape-like savages needing to be civilised gave rise to ‘darky’ iconography: caricatures with prominent eyes, shiningly white teeth against dark skin, exaggerated lips in terms of both colour and size, and often portrayed naked. These kinds of stereotypes reinforced the idea that people of other races were inferior to Caucasians. In time, the representation of black people came to incorporate not just perceived physical attributes, but also other ethnic stereotypes: slaves in the US were portrayed as lazy, lacking intelligence and less than human. 
Gradually, this has changed. In the States, it did so as a result of the civil rights movement, a gathering wave of protest against those states that had institutionalised the segregation of black people, that became a more general, ongoing striving for real equality. In some European countries, particularly Britain, inhabitants of colonised countries were encouraged to move from their homes to help support the economic rebuilding of nations after the Second World War; they did so in great numbers, settling, raising their families and making those countries home. In the resulting multi-cultural societies, depictions of black people in ways that stereotyped them and identified them with the historical roles they had been forced into, particularly in terms of servitude, became less and less acceptable over the past 20 to 30 years; so when people from those places encounter the images abroad today, they are surprised, to say the least. 
It is clear that the issue of racism in Spain is much larger and more complex than trying to understand why certain portrayals of black people are still common here, but the fact that they are can be seen as representative of the wider issue. On the one hand there is a lack of effort at educating the public, and on the other, there seems to be a fundamental attitude of denial.
The idea of tackling racism (including challenging ethnic stereotypes) is not one that has been seriously embraced by the authorities here. In April, human rights organisation Amnesty International published a report about racism in Spain, entitled ‘Between Lethargy and Invisibility’. It argued that the political and judicial systems are uninterested in dealing with racism in a country that has significant numbers of both new and longer-term immigrants, the latter including a population of gypsies who, despite centuries of living in Spain, are still treated as outsiders by many. And although a bit over 10 percent of the country’s population now comes from abroad, SOS Racisme’s Begoña Sánchez said that change is slow in coming. “The debate here is still, ‘immigration, yes or no?’, when immigration is already here.” 
While Spain does not share the multi-cultural history of the UK, the US or Canada, it is now home to an ever-growing immigrant population and that brings challenges at many levels. Perhaps the best indication of this is the fact that even in those countries where stereotypical images of black people would cause an outcry, racism continues to be a daily issue.


- See more at: http://www.barcelona-metropolitan.com/living/race-relations/#sthash.sSFdsGx0.dpuf




FOLLOW UP:

Did you know....
In the 1940-45 battle for homeland morale, American propaganda makers depicted Germany in a very different light than Japan -link: 
  • Germany was seen as a great nation gone mad. The Nazis might have been evil but there was still room for the “Good German.” 
  •  Japan, on the other hand, was depicted entirely as a brutal monolith .....   ...  ... US propagandists was to liken the Japanese to animals like snakes and rats.


WRITING  TASK. 


Summarise the article below. (175 words)

For a modern update about 1940 at war... LINK

   ...  US propagandists was to liken the Japanese to animals like snakes and rats.

A Critical Comparison Between Japanese and American 
Propaganda during World War II. 

 Anthony V. Navarro 

    The affects of propaganda, however, last well after treaties are signed and the dusts of war settle. Japan, though defeated, still held inside the same hatred for the United States it had before the war if not more so.  They played the role of defeated foe, smiling to appease their victors on the outside but contemptuous and demoralized on the inside. The United States still often referred to the Japanese as “Japs” or other racially derogatory names.  The words and images left to us by propaganda remain in a nation's collective memory.  They are vestiges of war-time.  However good or bad, those memories linger in culture.  The elements of war are not left on the battle field to wither away with those who perished.  Hate, anger, and contempt are brought home so that “war” becomes no longer a job but a way of life. 



DEBATE_a broken century? - a cup of tea with Jamie Scotmore


His latest video “Welcome to 2018, The Fake Society. The world is dying. This is why humanity is  in an all-out crack has so far been viewed over 1.8 million times on Facebook and 37,072 times on YouTube.
 It’s confronting, highly opinionated, and covers hot topics that are getting people riled up either in agreement or disagreement with James’s views. The Facebook post has been shared over 20,000+ times, liked over 7,500+ times, and has been commented on 620+ times already.

You tube link : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xFHXDuVA-dk 


What happend to our modern critical thinking citizens?
TASK_ Debate take issues with your world! 1-  LISTEN AND NOTE TAKING   ..................................... 5 min 
2-  Share your notes -- React to content (Group 3-4 people) ....4 min 3.  There are two texts:  (comment 1 ) +  (comments 2) 
   READ your text and find things their authors agree with Mr Scotmore.   And You?  May you agree with your writer on some of his views? 4. in pairs _  DEBATE (9 min) on modern life at this broken century?





 
  COMMENTS 1  

Jamie Scotmore is a 25 year old aspiring Public Figure who is trying to change the world.
Jamie campaigns about political and humanitarian topics by producing and sharing content for his ever-growing social media audience (as of today Jamie has 22,000 Facebook followers, 1,600 Twitter followers, 3,985 Instagram followers, and 11,129 YouTube subscribers). He also travels and has recently been at an orphanage on the Thai / Burmese border.
We’re sharing this because we think he’s worth following. He goes much wider than our predominant areas of sustainability and eco friendly living, but he has the environment’s back. Even if viewers only agree with some of what he says, he’s impressive. He’s passionate. He’s trying to make a change. He speaks to young (and old) people in a way that they can understand. He’s willing to put himself on the digital frontline and argue with thousands of people in his community over very confronting topics. If more 25 year olds do this and can raise awareness with the younger generation about global issues such as global warming, plastic pollution, the meat industry and other environmentally crippling topics, we can be hopeful that the future holds great change.

https://dailycoconut.com.au/ 2018/01/22/welcome-to-2018- the-fake-society-the-world-is- dying-a-video-by-james- scotmore/

 

                      COMMENTS 2   


 This video written and presented by James Scotmore does a fanatic job of highlight and exposing the corrupt nature of capitalism as a system driving the the modern civilization today.  As he writes, “in this society, there are many far reaching ethical implications that come from our actions.”
While I feel this video is very educational and definitely worth watching, it must be mentioned that during the video James refers to religions (including Islam) as “human constructs” and not something to be followed.  He’s right and wrong…definitely some religions and more importantly, what some people throughout history have done with religion, are human constructs.  Just like at how Islam has been used and manipulated in the last 100 years proves his point for sure, BUT Islam the religion, the way of life, the ideology, Islam at it’s core, is NOT a human construct.
We believe and follow Islam because our human mind concludes through sound logic & intelligent that there is a creator, and this creator speak to his creation through the perfect linguistic miracle that is Quran.  The irony is that many, if not all, the problems that this video exposes, Islam has a law/guideline that would eliminate these problems.  But until us Muslims get our intellectual act together, this video will be the new reality of life for a long time.
Please watch and think!

FOLLOW - up:  See Jidienne's comments on the video

UPDATE - (retrieved 10/May/2018)

Readership: Jamie has
29,254 Facebook followers,
1,632 Twitter followers,
3,876 Instagram followers,
11,129 YouTube subscribers)





Sunday, May 6, 2018

Beyond Gender communities -Sidney and friends


Sidney & Friends


Director: Tristan Aitchison

DOP: Tristan Aitchison, Zahra Moloo
Music: Paul Terry
Release:               2018
Duration: 75 min.
I always wanted to do this in a way that is not sensationalist but soft and touching, the sort of film you would want to give a hug to…that is Sidney & Friends. — Tristan Aitchison


TRAILER

http://planettransgender.com/sidney-and-friends-kenya/ 

This film is guerrilla and zero-budget. We have been able to complete the film through incredible hard work from our post-production team whom have contributed their talents and time.

REVIEW 1 -

Sidney and Friends Kenya’s Hidden Trans Community

Sidney and Friends
Coming to film festivals in 2018, “Sidney and Friends” a documentary delving into Kenya’s transgender community as never seen before.
They live in the shadows disowned by family and disconnected from community, in a constant struggle for survival yet are amazing in their love of life.
 
The making of Sidney and Friends fortuitous, to say the least. Filmmaker Tristan MG Aitchison, from the northern highlands of Scotland, felt compelled to travel to Kenya where he said that knew he’d find a story, but had no idea what it was. This is where he found the first of many of Sidney’s friends in Kenya, arguably one of the most transphobic places on earth. 
“I didn’t set out to make this film when I traveled to Kenya in 2013, but by chance, I met someone… Guillit, a transboy who wanted to be heard…” said Aitchison “I was welcomed into the small community where other filmmakers and journalists had been refused access…” 
“Some interviews were incredibly difficult. Our contributors have suffered traumatic life events and there were a number of times I had chills at what I was being told. Sidney recalls one occasion he was being beaten by a group with clubs and sticks while his mother just stood and watched.

Image result for tristan  times has your family tried to kill you  sidney and friendsThe challenges for LGBT people around the world can be very different and yet often share common themes. While there’s been unprecedented attention played to the transsexual community in the west in the past year or so, as well as converage of increasingly anti-gay attitudes in parts of Africa – what is it like to be transgender and/or intersex in Kenya?
That’s what Scottish filmmaker Tristan MG Aitchison’s Sidney & Friends accidentally set out to explore in Sidney & Friends, focussing on interviews with six members of the intersex and transgender community of Nairobi. While in western countries, many of the problems the trans* community faces involve dealing with intolerant elements of society, in Africa the issue is often that people don’t even know they exist.
El documental britànic Sidney & Friends, dirigit per Tristan Aitchinson ha estat el gran guanyador de la secció oficial del 15è Festival Internacional de Cinema Social de Catalunya que s'ha clausurat aquest diumenge a la tarda a l'Auditori Agustí Soler i Mas de Navarcles.


El documental guardonat Sidney & Friends, que tracta la història d'un jove intersexual a Kenia que ha de lluitar contra la incomprensió de la seva família, que el vol matar perquè pensa que està posseït pel dimoni, i que troba en un grup d'amics transgèneres l'autoestima, amor i un sentit de la vida. Ha recollit el premi el seu director Tristan Aitchinson, que sensiblement emocionat, ha agraït el premi i el seu missatge de denúncia i de respecte als drets humans.


REVIEW 4 - Regio7

Durant l'acte de cloenda, els premiats van poder dirigir unes paraules al públic. La majoria són de fora de Catalunya i van enviar vídeos d'agraïment. Però el britànic Tristan Aitchison va assistir a la cita i va compartir la seva història amb Regió7

«Vaig viatjar a Kenya per visitar la meva germana però no m'imaginava que em trobaria amb aquesta història. Tot va ser fruit de la casualitat», va explicar el premiat. Mentre s'emocionava, va comentar que va trobar una persona intersexual que se sentia incompresa i no tenia veu. «Tenia una càmera, un micròfon i molta curiositat per conèixer aquella història», va recordar Aitchison. Assegura que va trigar gairebé quatre anys a acabar el documental, perquè no tenia ajuts econòmics. «Però ha valgut la pena perquè ara el jove ha rebut un raig de llum d'esperança i no se sent tan sol», va afirmar el cineasta.





The Divine Order - 2017 -Die göttliche Ordnung


Die göttliche Ordnung Film








The Divine Order is set in Switzerland in 1971 where, despite the worldwide social upheavals of the previous decade, women were still denied the right to vote. When unassuming and dutiful housewife Nora (Marie Leuenberger, winner of a Best Actress award at Tribeca) is forbidden by her husband to take a part-time job, her frustration leads to her becoming the poster child of her town’s suffragette movement. 



Interview (13:28) youtube with Director Petra Volpe


Her newfound celebrity brings humiliation, threats, and the potential end to her marriage, but, refusing to back down, she convinces the women in her village to go on strike...and makes a few startling discoveries about her own liberation. Uplifting and crowd-pleasing, this charming, captivating film is a time-capsule that could not be more timely.
Released in August 2017, it was selected as the Swiss entry for the Best Foreign Language Film at the 90th Academy Awards, but it was not nominated. The Swiss film Die göttliche Ordnung was shown in the U.S. with the translated title The divine order.

Review1

Women in some cantons were afforded the right to vote on cantonal issues in the 1960s. But it was not until 1971 that a referendum finally led to a law being passed that allowed women to vote on national matters. A new Swiss film sheds light on (and endearingly pokes fun at) this fact, and offers a semi fictionalized account of what life was like in Switzerland in the early 1970s.







Review2


The laughs are mixed with clumsy, comradely tenderness between the women. “I wanted to prove that a feminist political film can be funny,” Volpe says, “because humour is a wonderful seducing force in cinema, and it really opens people up. Once you’re allowed to laugh, you’re also allowed to cry.” (...)
But marital law that a man could forbid his wife to work and that women couldn’t open their own bank accounts didn’t change till 1988 in Switzerland. (...)
As Volpe has taken The Divine Order around European and American cinemas, she’s noticed a chord being struck. “I’ve learned that there’s a huge desire and longing for female stories,” she observes. “And that it’s possible to create empathy for injustice with movies. Something that also made me a bit sad is that women are extremely grateful for this movie. 

ROTTEN TOMATOES _46 reviews

===== BONUS TRACK

REVIEW FRENCH_   « Les Conquérantes » : les Suissesses se rebiffent

In FRENCH vlog: Cemilchosesatedire (9:23) 


In FRENCH audio: La chronique de Pascal Bernheim (9:37)